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Annual Spyderco Closeout

Annual Spyderco Closeout

That’s the Ticket!

SEE THE SALE!

This is Spyderco’s annual clearance of their discontinued knives. We have reserved as many as we could of these incredible deals from Spyderco, but we don’t know how many we will actually get. Quantities are not guaranteed, so get your order in at these super low prices!

Top 5 Sub-$100 Knives with S30V or S35VN Steel

CPM-S30V and CPM-S35VN stainless steels were developed by Crucible Industries, an American company that produces specialty steels. They worked with famous knife makers like Chris Reeve to create new steels specifically to be used for knives. First came the well-balanced S30V with its amazing edge retention and high corrosion resistance. Then S35VN came along and upped the ante in regards to toughness and its ability to be polished. Some may argue that S30V has lost its super steel status because it has become so prevalent in the EDC knife world. At KnifeCenter, we still hold high regard for S30V and S35VN steel – their Particle Metallurgy construction adds additional toughness thanks to the very refined grain structure, and the vanadium in their composition helps these knives cut better than those that rely on a higher chromium count. In layman’s terms: these knives cut, and cut very well.

If you’re thinking, “yeah, that’s great and all, but I can’t really afford a knife with such high quality steel”, we agree – these steels come at a price. There are plenty of mid-tech knives out there sporting S35VN steel that can easily cost you four-hundred bucks. We understand the importance of having top-notch steel, though, so we’ve pulled together our top five sub-$100 knives with S30V or S35VN steel. Now you can enjoy a premium EDC knife without losing a big chunk of your paycheck.

 

Cold Steel 58PS Code 4 Spear Point Folding Knife

 

 

Cold Steel’s Code 4 folder utilizes their world-renowned Tri-Ad lock, which was designed by Andrew Demko to be one of the strongest knife locking mechanisms on the planet. Why S35VN over S30V? Cold Steel is a known purveyor of some of the toughest knives out there, and S30V does have a reputation for micro-bevel chipping during tough use. S35VN’s elemental composition improves that aspect of the steel, so it’s a better option if you’re looking to do some more serious cutting work. Also, this knife perfectly shows off S35VN’s ability to be polished compared to S30V – just look at that high satin shine. This knife gives you all the cutting power of high quality steel in a lightweight package that perfectly complements any EDC.

 

 

Buck 347 Vantage Pro Large Folding Knife

 

 

In our opinion, the Vantage is one of the best affordable everyday carry knives on the market. From the molded nylon/CNC-contoured G10 handles to the dual steel liners, this American-made folder’s built to be a knife that you actually use every day – EDC isn’t just a title with this one. Joe Talmadge, a master of blade geometry, claims the S30V steel you’ll find on this knife might be the ultimate in high-end stainless steels thanks to its superior performance and sharpenability compared to other super steels in its class.

 

 

Kizer Cutlery Sliver Folding Knife

 

 

The Kizer Sliver’s sleek design is complemented by the high end materials – S35VN steel and uniquely worked aluminum handles. This knife is precision machined and engineered to the finest tolerances. While the S35VN steel is the cherry on top of this cake, it’s the orange handle that sets this knife apart. The overall shape gives off serious trapper knife vibes, and we are into it.

 

 

White River Knives Backpacker Fixed Blade

 

 

White River Knives doesn’t get the recognition that it should. In our experience, all we’ve seen from this knife company are truly great products. In fact, this is one of our favorite skeletonized neck knives on the production market. White River rounded the finger cut out so perfectly on the Backpacker that ‘comfortable’ doesn’t even begin to cover it. S30V steel is perfect for skinning knives and neck knives because its bailiwick is precision cutting. The Kydex sheath allows you to wear the knife on your belt in two ways, or around your neck if you attach a lanyard.

 

 

Spyderco Native 5 Folding Knife

 

 

 

To round out the list, we’ve got one of Spyderco’s greatest knife designs of all time paired with S30V steel. In some knives, it’s obvious certain materials are the reason for the price – be it premium steel or Micarta scales. With the Native 5, you’re getting an all-around great knife. Compared to the standard Delica or Endura’s VG-10 steel, the S30V is a pretty big upgrade. Many say this is Spyderco’s best pocket knife option on the market, and we have to agree – this knife easily rivals the performance of knives double its value.

 

There you have it – KnifeCenter’s top 5 sub-$100 knives with S30V or S35VN steel. There are other options out there, but we honestly feel that these knives provide some of the best bang for your buck. Now that these super steels are becoming much more common in the EDC knife market, prices are just going to become more and more accessible to a wider range of people. In our opinion, that’s the best way to run the knife game – because everyone should have steel in their pocket. Why not make it some of the best?

 

KnifeCenter’s Review: Spyderco’s Earth Brown G10 Para 3

 

Spyderco’s new limited edition Para 3 sports S35VN blade steel and earth brown G10 handle scales. This premium steel gives you a great combination of edge retention, durability, and corrosion resistance. The scales are lightly textured and offer a secure grip in the hand without adding bulk and the earth brown color is easy on the eyes, which pairs well with the satin finish on the blade and metallic pocket clip. Check out the full review on Spyderco’s latest limited edition run in the video!

The Best New Pocket Knives of 2018

We may only be a little more than halfway through 2018, but we’ve been wowed by the number of incredible knives that have made their way onto the scene this year. We’ve picked what we think are the best pocket knives (so far) of 2018.  These are definitely must-have additions to any EDC rotation.

 

Spyderco C227GP Brad Southard Hanan

 

A gracious gift, indeed! If you haven’t been brushing up on your Hebrew lately, that’s what Hanan means – and it pretty much describes this folding knife to a T. Designed by custom knife maker Brad Southard, the Hanan is one of the best gentleman’s folding knives to hit the market this year. Unlike most Spyderco knives, the Trademark Round Hole is much smaller than you’ll typically see, which is because this Spydiehole is mostly aesthetic. Instead, you’re going to rely on the flipper tab to deploy the blade. In our opinion, a gentleman’s pocket knife has to have certain qualities to make it worthy of the title – and the Hanan delivers that in spades. The two-tone G10/titanium hybrid handles are smooth and have an elegance that screams ‘class’. Plus, you can’t go wrong with S30V steel.

Why we picked it: Brad Southard is an amazing knife maker and designer, and his collaborations with Spyderco are no exception. This knife combines great design with high-end materials.

 

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Two of Spyderco’s Best Folding Knives Get a Makeover

The Endura and Delica, two of Spyderco’s most popular folding pocket knives, got a serious glow up with these new FRN Zome Camo handles. Zome is an ancient Japanese art form that focuses on dyeing textiles using dyes from plants, flowers, fruit, and other natural sources. Take a look at KnifeCenter’s review where we dive into what makes these handles so unique!

The Five Best Spyderco Knives

We’re celebrating 40 years of Spyderco! In honor of their ruby anniversary, we’re going through the five best Spyderco knives.

The Para 3

 

 

The Para 3 is arguably one of the best production knives ever created. With its distinctive design and comfortable ergonomics, it feels as good as it looks – as evidenced by the finger choil that provides comfort and control when cutting. The Para 3 comes in a few different steels, but it comes standard with an S30V. The Para 3 also features Spyderco’s Compression Lock, which is considered by many to be one of the best locking mechanisms on the market. A 4-position pocket clip allows any user to carry the knife in a way that feels natural to them. One thing that would be nice to see from Spyderco moving forward for this knife would be a wider variety of steels.

 

The Endura 4

This Endura 4 is a KnifeCenter Exclusive with an HAP40/SUS410 blade and Mahogany Pakkawood handles. 

 

The first thing that stands out about the Endura 4 is that it’s a larger folding knife at a really good price. The Endura 4 rocks a large VG-10 steel blade and offers some jimping both on and behind the thumb ramp for added control and grip. It has Spyderco’s back lock that offers a solid and secure blade when deployed. The Endura 4 also comes in a variety of colors to fit your personality. The FRN handle is next to indestructible, but if that’s not your style we offer an exclusive Endura 4 in Pakkawood which gives a nice classic modern mix up to this well-loved design.

 

The Delica

This genuine mother of pearl handle is a beautiful addition to the Delica’s design.

 

The Delica is one of Spyderco’s best-selling models and has been around for over 20 years. What we feel makes this knife so legendary is its ability to offer so much without being a huge knife. Even though it’s not the biggest knife, because of its refined ergonomics it offers you a sturdy, precision cutting tool that can stand toe-to-toe with larger knives. The Delica, like the Endura, comes in a wide array of colors – there are even a few versions with handle materials such as abalone and mother of pearl. Of course, we also have the Pakkawood handle model that can only be found here at KnifeCenter.

 

The Yojimbo 2

 

The Yojimbo 2 is a newer model from Spyderco. It was designed by noted personal-defense trainer Michael Janich to be the perfect self-defense tool. The thing that catches your eye right off the bat is the large Wharncliffe blade. The straight blade transfers power all the way to the tip and ensures improved point strength. The Yojimbo was made with some of the best knife handle material available – S30V, S90V, and CPM-20CV. The handles are either G10 or carbon fiber. When closed the Yojimbo 2 sits comfortably in the pocket, but can be deployed quickly. Finally, this knife comes with Spyderco’s Compression Lock, the last piece to turn this into both a functional and effective high-performance tool.

 

The Manix

 

The Manix is one of the top EDC knives we have found. It is well-balanced between size and functionality and is available in a wide variety of some of the best steels on Earth. Like the Para 3, the Manix also has a finger choil for added control and comfort when cutting. The Manix also has a good amount of jimping for added grip, especially on the thumb ramp. One thing that Spyderco has definitely tried to do is to make a Manix for everyone. They have changed the steel, color, and even the handle material in an effort to give you the best knife possible. They even offer a lightweight model for those that are not fans of the larger, heavier knives. The patented ball bearing lock puts the finishing touch on this already great design, giving you a very solid lock that is perfect for one hand operation.

 

There you have it – five incredible knives from one of the best knife companies in the business. The best part is – you can get every single one from KnifeCenter, the original and largest online catalog of cutlery.

 

 

Classic Spyderco Knives from the Vault!

Knives that flooded the market years ago return better than ever as new production models with updated features all the time, and Spyderco is no exception. One of the (many) benefits of working at KnifeCenter is that your personal knife collection will grow to include some older knives that will be collectible reminders of some of the best times in knife history. Jason, our buyer, and Howard Korn, our Founder and CEO, were gracious enough to bring some classic Spyderco knives out of retirement for this blog – so let’s take a trip down memory lane.

 

The Spyderco Worker

This retired Worker model was produced in 1997 and was their first knife to transition from the traditional GIN-1 steel to ATS-55 steel. Spyderco used ATS-55 prominently in their Japanese-made knives from 1998-2003.    

 

We have to kick off our list of classic Spyderco knives with the knife that started it all. The original Worker was debuted at the 1981 SHOT Show in New Orleans. It was Spyderco’s first folding pocket knife to offer their trademarked Round Hole and a pocket clip for convenient carry (which also marks it as the first Spyderco Clipit model). Later iterations also introduced Spyderco’s fully serrated SpyderEdge. Jason picked up this model in 2001, which fell in the 1998-2003 ‘Golden Era of Spyders’.

 

First Generation Spyderco Q 

This Q model is one of three designs that commemorate the fantastic efforts of Blade Magazine, one of the best knife publications and a must-have resource for any knife enthusiast.

 

Collectors everywhere would be pretty excited to have any knife from Spyderco’s Q series, especially this rare Blade Magazine commemorative model. This knife comes engraved with its original Collector Card number and encased in the early edition of Spyderco’s white boxes. The original Q was named the Silhouette, and it was created specifically so you could commission knives with a unique company logo of your very own. The Q series is comprised almost exclusively of knives with laser cut logos, including a 1998 SHOT Show edition.

 

The Spyderco Co-Pilot

Fans of this Co-Pilot model say it has the smoothest action of the bunch. Since only 1,200 pieces were ever produced, getting your hands on one puts you in an exclusive Spyderco club of collectors.

 

This may be hard to believe considering the rules and regulations of the present day, but originally the Co-Pilot was sold as a two-inch airline knife that you could take with you on a plane. The original Co-Pilot was produced between 1987 and 2001, before the full ban on bladed items on airplanes, and while times have changed this compact design endures. Here we have one of the more expensive variations that was introduced as a sprint run in 2006 and comes with VG-10 steel and Almite aluminum handles.

 

The Spyderco Native III

 

Now for something a little more familiar to the non-collecting knife lovers out there – the Native III. This is an example of a knife that has seen quite an evolution since the original Native was released in 1997. The C78 Native III you’re seeing here has an industry nickname – ‘3D’ – because of the handle’s thick design, palm swell, and textured thumb and finger pads. Introduced in 2004, this version of the Native III has a VG-10 blade and a distinct swedge-grind that reduces weight and adds balance.

The Native line continues to be a pretty prolific series, but the latest iterations still keep the same overall aesthetic.

 

A back-to-back shot of the original Native III and a new Native 5 makes it easy to see the newer model’s upgraded S35VN full flat grind blade. The Native 5 also has a screw construction and is produced in Spyderco’s USA factory in Golden, Colorado. 

 

The Spyderco Vesuvius

 

Designed by late longtime custom knifemaker and former President of the American Knifemaker’s Guild Frank Centofante, this first generation Vesuvius was introduced in 2001 with ATS-34 steel – the predecessor to ATS-55. This knife kicked off a series of Spyderco-Centofante collaborations that includes four Vesuvius models, and his presence made such an impact that Spyderco designed a memorial knife in his name to commemorate the incredible contributions he made to educate Spyderco’s manufacturing team.

 

The Spyderco Endura

The original Endura was one of the first Spyderco knives that came with a tip-up pocket clip.

 

The Endura made waves in 1990 when it was first introduced and won Blade Magazine’s ‘Overall Knife of the Year’. The original iteration had some features that were later improved or changed for future Spyderco knives – the pocket clip, for example, was notorious for breaking because of its thin build. Later versions had a thicker clip to avoid cracking and breaking issues. Spyderco produced a version with a red Zytel handle, as well, before using that handle color exclusively for their training knives – a practice they maintain to this day.

 

The latest Endura models have come a long way. Newer Enduras have a larger Spydie Hole, a four-way pocket clip, skeletonized liners, and a thicker tip than their old school predecessors.

 

One of the coolest things about looking back at these classic models is that you can really see Spyderco getting their footing – these small changes and additions are reflected in every new Spyderco knife that we see. Of course, we can’t talk about the Endura without also bringing up…

 

The Spyderco Delica

The ‘Big Brother’ to the Endura, the Delica has seen a myriad of updates and improvements throughout its decades-long history.

 

This industry favorite has been in every single one of Spyderco’s product catalogs since at least 1993. Originally designed by Sal Glesser, the first generation Delica became a bestseller that was created specifically to provide a lightweight pocket knife with a one-handed opening that almost anyone could afford. The second generation Delica was debuted in 2006 with some new upgrades – a stainless steel handle, a stainless steel pocket clip, and an AUS-6 steel blade. It wasn’t until 2001 that the Boye dent and reversible pocket clip were added to the Generation 3 model.

 

Just like with the Endura, the Delica has come a long way from the original. These two knives have seen much of the same improvements over time, including the larger Spydie Hole and Boye dent lockback mechanism.

 

That wraps up some of our favorites – what classic Spyderco knives do you have in your collection? We’re always itching for any chance to whip out some of our oldies (and goodies). What knives would you like to see next? Be sure to visit our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter and tag us in some photos of your own vintage Spyderco knives.

KnifeCenter is the original and largest online catalog of cutlery, and that includes the best Spyderco knives in the world.

Spyderco Fan Favorites!

We put out an APB last week asking our Facebook followers what their favorite Spyderco knives were – and boy, did you guys deliver. We had a lot of entries featuring some great old and new Spydercos, so here’s a list of your favorite folders that we agree are some of the top knives in the industry.

 

Spyderco Endura

David W. had a tough choice when it came to which Spyderco knife to show off – he has SIXTEEN Enduras! Here’s what he had to say about his favorite Spyderco:

“To me, the Endura is a great user: it fits my hand well, carries easily, and handles any package or carton I can throw at it. On the other side of things, Spyderco seems to come up with an endless supply of variants and sprint runs that make collecting it even better.”

This Spyderco Endura Damascus model makes for one beautiful EDC. Photo Cred: David W

 

David isn’t the only one that wanted to show off this popular Spyderco folder. Pavel R. describes the “knife crush” he had for his Endura before it was lost by a friend who had borrowed it:

“[The Endura] was my knife crush. Many knives came after her, but she will be in my heart forever.”

We can’t blame Pavel for being heartbroken over the loss of his Spyderco Endura. His hope for a sprint run of this model may be a reality – we’re thinking this new blue/gray FRN model may be his new love! Photo Cred: Pavel R

 

Spyderco C83 Persian

Dan T. hit us with an oldie, but a goodie – the original C83 Persian by Ed Schempp. The original Persian was produced back in 2004-2005, and you’ll see some Eastern influence in the upswept blade and uniquely curved handle. That’s not all that Dan loves about this classic Spyderco knife:

“One of the most beautiful pocket knives there ever was. Great curves. Great old school bolsters and Micarta.”

Ed Schempp’s Persian isn’t in production anymore, but we do have some Spyderco folding knives that sport a similar trailing point blade shape. Photo Cred: Dan T

 

Spyderco Manix 2

Joseph H is a fan of another popular Spyderco knife – the Manix 2. The Manix is one of the best selling combat knife series we offer. As you can see, Joseph has one heck of a Spyderco collection. Why does he choose the Manix 2 over the rest?

“So far the Manix 2 is my favorite…because the locking mechanism is awesome and I really like the blade shape.”

Funny that Joseph would take this shot on his keyboard…we may or may not be currently drooling on ours. These aren’t all Spydercos, obviously – we see some Zero Tolerance and Benchmade models in here – but they do certainly stand out from the crowd thanks to those trademark Spyderholes. Photo Cred: Joseph H

 

Spyderco Techno

A man of few words, Chris G. has only this to say about his Spyderco:

“My Techno, love it.”

And what’s not to love? The Techno packs a tremendous amount of strength and utility into an incredibly compact package. It also has a progressive European appearance that comes straight from the mind of Polish knifemaker Marcin Slysz.

That CTS-XHP steel blade is a heavy hitter for Spyderco. Photo Cred: Chris G

 

Jonas N. also chose the Techno as his favorite Spyderco knife.

The Techno for all circumstances. 😉

Jonas’ photo of his Techno is the perfect argument for why everyone should have an EDC – and having a Spyderco as your everyday carry means you’ll be the big cheese (sorry, we couldn’t resist). Photo Cred: Jonas N

 

We were blown away by all the responses we had – thanks to everyone who sent us photos of their favorite Spyderco knives! If you want to be featured on the blog, make sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter and share your best snaps with us.

KnifeCenter is the original and largest online catalog of cutlery, and that includes the best Spyderco folding knives in the world.

The Results of the Knife World Cup!

We received more than 20,000 comments over the course of 15 rounds in our Knife World Cup tournament – no small achievement, and we have all of you to thank! Any time we do a giveaway we hit some of our highest numbers, but this was definitely one of our more successful campaigns. From June 11th to July 18th, we asked you guys to stay tuned to our social media feeds and vote in every round – and one lucky winner (congrats, Daniel!) who did so won a Chris Reeve Sebenza.

The goal of this tournament was for the best knife to win, so we did see some unlikely matchups. We know we compared apples and oranges sometimes, but it was all done at random to ensure that we didn’t put any of our bias into the tournament. We also counted all the comments. Nothing was done by eye – we let an Excel spreadsheet do the work, instead. Here is a rundown of each round so you can see just how much your vote counted.

 

Round One – Match 01

The Benchmade Griptilian reigned supreme in this round, beating the Ontario Rat 1,257 to 422.

 

Round One – Match 02

Round two was a shutout victory for Zero Tolerance, whose 0562 beat the Emerson CQC-7 1,253 to 351.

 

Round One – Match 03

This matchup was much closer than the previous ones – the Buck 110 won over the WE Knives 703, 841 to 533.

 

Round One – Match 04

Another close round, but Rick Hinderer’s XM-18 still came out on top over Cold Steel’s Recon – the final score was 761 to 575.

 

Round One – Match 05

One of our closest rounds of the entire tournament, the Kershaw Leek went head-to-head with Boker’s Kwaiken. The Kwaiken came out on top, 709 to 622.

 

Round One – Match 06

KA-BAR’s 1217 USMC smoked the ESEE Izula – the final score was 1,285 to 681.

 

Round One – Match 07

This round introduced the overall winner, so we obviously know the outcome of this one – the Chris Reeve Sebenza beat out the Microtech Ultratech 814 to 425.

 

Round One – Match 08

The final match of round one was a total landslide – Spyderco’s Paramilitary 2 beat the Kizer Gemini 1,022 to 133.

 

Round Two – Match 01

The Griptilian once again came out on top, beating the Buck 110 1,025 to 372.

 

Round Two – Match 02

The Sebenza was victorious once again, this time knocking the Boker Kwaiken out of the tournament. The final score was 961 to 323.

 

Round Two – Match 03

ZT came out on top against Rick Hinderer’s XM-18. The 0562 won 711 to 461.

 

Round Two – Match 04

The final match of round two brought Spyderco victory – the Paramilitary 2 dominated over the 1217 USMC 923 to 308.

 

Semi-Finals – Match 01

Things are firing up, and the Griptilian couldn’t take the heat. The Sebenza won 651 to 496.

 

Semi-Finals – Match 02

The Paramilitary 2 heads to the final round after winning 720 to 459 against the ZT 0562.

 

The Final Round!

Here we have it – the final round. It was close, and the Paramilitary 2 put up one heck of a fight…but the victory went to the Chris Reeve Sebenza with a final score of 730 to 539.

 

This was a fun experiment on our end, and we hope you guys got just as much joy as we did reading through the comments and seeing different perspectives on the matchups. Despite our penchant for mischief (looking at you, That’s What I Call Knives: Volume One), nothing was rigged on our end. At the end of the day, we have to give you guys props for your taste in knives – you definitely picked a winner!

 

Introducing The Knife Guide!

You know KnifeCenter is the largest and original catalog of cutlery, but did you also know we’ve been an educational resource since our launch in 1995? From day one, we’ve been an international hub with the latest knife news. One of our biggest goals was to not only be able to give you the largest collection of products, but also have all the information you’d ever need about knives and tools to make an informed purchase.

One thing we take very seriously is making it easier for knife newbies to enter the industry. That’s why we’ve created The Knife Guide – a series of videos that will cover a wide range of topics, from learning about knife parts to knife and tool maintenance (and everything in between).

We already have the first two installments ready and rolling on our YouTube channel!

 

The Knife Guide 01: Defining an EDC

This video will not only define an EDC, but will explain a little bit about folding knives, pocket knives, fixed blade knives, multi-tools, and some rules for choosing a knife or tool that’s the right fit for you. You can also check out all of the products that we used in the video, just in case any of them caught your eye or seemed like a good fit for a first-time knife or tool buyer.

 

The Knife Guide 02: What is a Folding Pocket Knife? 

In the second installment of the series, we dug into exactly what a folding knife is – the parts, how they work, what additions impact the cost of a folding knife, the different types of locking mechanisms and how they function, and some of the trademarks you’ll see in folding knives from well known manufacturers like Spyderco and Benchmade. We pulled out some great knives to help showcase these features, that way you’ll know our recommendations and can feel confident picking up any one of these folders.

 

We’ll be adding new videos weekly on YouTube and featuring the products on our website. We’re going to talk about what a fixed blade is, the best way to sharpen steel, the different blade shapes and what blade types are best for specific tasks, the different types of steel and how they compare, the best knife handle materials, and more. We’re also eager to see what type of content you’d like to see in this series – nothing is off limits! Be sure to head to our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to let us know what you think and your recommendations for what you’d like featured in this series next!