Combat/Tactical Knife & Gear Roundup: 9/27/2020

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SOG continues to impress with a compact yet beefy folder, Gayle Bradley has a new fixed blade for Spyderco, Kizer introduces an affordable folder ready for the line of duty, and more this week.

Survival/Outdoor Knife & Gear Roundup: 9-19-2020

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The biggest news this week is the drop of two great new KnifeCenter Exclusive models, one from SOG and one from Victorinox Swiss Army. Check them, and more great tools, below!

Combat/Tactical Knife & Gear Roundup: 5/9/2020

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This week SOG continues to show us they are back with a vengeance with their reimagined Trident, Spartan Blades impresses us with their new collabs with KA-BAR, and some new “glowy” Spyderco classics light things up. That and more after the jump.

Combat/Tactical Knife & Gear Roundup: 4/11/2020

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AL MAR is back this week with new iterations of the classic SERE folder! On top of that, we’ve got a cool KA-BAR fixed blade but it isn’t the one you are thinking of, our favorite new SOG folder, and more.

Best Damascus Pocket Knives Under $100

Civivi Plethiros with Damascus blade resting on black rocks

It looks great, but is Damascus Steel any good? For sure! Made from two or more metals, the performance of a Damascus blade is directly tied to the base steels used to make it, which can be carbon steel or stainless. Knives with Damascus steel can climb in price very quickly, but there are still some affordable options out there that should still perform quite well. These are some of the best Damascus pocket knives for under $100 that you can get in 2020!

Combat/Tactical Knife & Gear Roundup: 4/4/2020

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This week, among other things, we have a brand new ZT release, some bargain-priced and factory modified Ontario combat knives and more. See more after the jump!

Combat/Tactical Knife & Gear Roundup: 1/18/2020

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This week, among other things, we have a fantastic Benchmade (which has unfortunately been discontinued, so don’t sleep on it) designed for martial and aircrew use, a brand new folding dagger from CRKT, and a new batch of ADV fixed blades to check out. See more below.

Combat/Tactical Knife & Gear Roundup: 1/4/2020

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For our first tactical roundup of the new decade we bring you some heavy hitters from the last one, including the best Gerber combat knife in a while, a great deal on an Ontario folder, some classics from SOG, and an unexpected entry from Condor, amongst other great tactical pocket knives and fixed blades.

Combat/Tactical Knife & Gear Roundup: 12/21/2019

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If you’ve been craving new Al Mar designs, then we’ve got your fix this week. Additionally, you won’t want to miss the return of the ZT 0566, a cool new Emerson/Spyderco crossover, and more great tactical fixed blades and pocket knives.

The Best Frame Lock Knives

Let’s talk about the frame lock, one of the most enduring locks on the market. From historic, iconic knives to new innovators, we’re going to take a look at seven of our favorite frame lock designs which you can find at the KnifeCenter.

Also known as the Integral Lock, the frame lock functions similarly to a liner lock, but instead of a thin liner that holds the blade open, the entire thickness of the frame becomes a lockbar. This makes a secure system that only gets better when you grip harder.

 

The Chris Reeve Sebenza

The first knife we’ll be looking at is a no-brainer. No list of frame locks would be complete without the Chris Reeve Sebenza.

 

Not only is Reeve the inventor of the frame lock, but he has also dominated the genre for years. Originally developed in 1987, the Sebenza is still the standard by which all other frame locks are judged. Their fit and finish are impeccable and well known for their “bank vault” solid lockup.

The classic version features this elegant drop point blade with a hollow grind (although you can also get it with a tanto) or their Insingo blade shape, which bears a modified sheepsfoot profile.

The frame on the Sebenza is solid titanium, which carries nice and thin in the pocket. If you want a little more girth, there are versions inlaid with materials like wood or Micarta. Both add extra grip and style, but the ultimate versions feature either or both milled Computer Generated Graphics and Damascus blades.

 

 

People keep coming back to the Sebenza for a reason. Tweaked and improved over time, this archetype of the genre has stood the test of time and isn’t going away anytime soon.