8 Great Knives and Tools for Survivalists

It’s mid-August, and we here in Fredericksburg, Virginia still have plenty of time to get some solid camping sessions in before winter makes it extra fun. If you’re looking to upgrade your pack or pocket with some new outdoor essentials, you’ll find some great options in this list of eight must-have survivalist tools.

 

CRKT Ignitor Assisted Folders

The Ignitor sets the standard for value-priced, high-tech folding knives with its patented features and layered G10 handle scales. Not only do you get the surefire action of its OutBurst assisted deployment, but you also get the security of CRKT’s patent-pending Fire Safe mechanism. This design offers the best integration of folder safety and fast access that we’ve ever seen in a sport or work folder. We have plain blade options and models with Veff serrations, which are great for cutting cord, netting, and vegetation quickly.

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Cold Steel Chaos Kukri vs. The Wilderness

 

You’ve seen Cold Steel’s Chaos Tanto go head-to-head with Jason’s pickup truck. Now it’s time to test out their Chaos Kukri – but this time, we’re going against a much more powerful foe: Mother Nature. Watch our demo to see how this beefy fixed blade handles the great outdoors!

Top Picks: Mid-Summer Outdoor & Survival Gear

Twice a month we pull together some of the best outdoor and survival knives and tools so you can update your outdoor pack or emergency kit. Basically, we’re doing the work so you can spend less time shopping and more time adventuring. This week we have a cool variety of items that range from folding steak knives to knife bracelets. Intrigued? Check out the items below and follow the links to fill your cart with some mid-summer camping essentials.

 

Boker Magnum Outdoor Cuisine III Folder

Looking forward to an upcoming camping trip? Are you a survival enthusiast or bushcrafter who wants to pack light? The Magnum Cuisine III is a kitchen knife designed for the great outdoors that will cut through freshly grilled game with ease. The broad 440C Japanese Nakiri-style blade is perfect for slicing through both tough meat and delicate veggies, and the Rosewood scales feel as good as they look.

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Classic Spyderco Knives from the Vault!

Knives that flooded the market years ago return better than ever as new production models with updated features all the time, and Spyderco is no exception. One of the (many) benefits of working at KnifeCenter is that your personal knife collection will grow to include some older knives that will be collectible reminders of some of the best times in knife history. Jason, our buyer, and Howard Korn, our Founder and CEO, were gracious enough to bring some classic Spyderco knives out of retirement for this blog – so let’s take a trip down memory lane.

 

The Spyderco Worker

This retired Worker model was produced in 1997 and was their first knife to transition from the traditional GIN-1 steel to ATS-55 steel. Spyderco used ATS-55 prominently in their Japanese-made knives from 1998-2003.    

 

We have to kick off our list of classic Spyderco knives with the knife that started it all. The original Worker was debuted at the 1981 SHOT Show in New Orleans. It was Spyderco’s first folding pocket knife to offer their trademarked Round Hole and a pocket clip for convenient carry (which also marks it as the first Spyderco Clipit model). Later iterations also introduced Spyderco’s fully serrated SpyderEdge. Jason picked up this model in 2001, which fell in the 1998-2003 ‘Golden Era of Spyders’.

 

First Generation Spyderco Q 

This Q model is one of three designs that commemorate the fantastic efforts of Blade Magazine, one of the best knife publications and a must-have resource for any knife enthusiast.

 

Collectors everywhere would be pretty excited to have any knife from Spyderco’s Q series, especially this rare Blade Magazine commemorative model. This knife comes engraved with its original Collector Card number and encased in the early edition of Spyderco’s white boxes. The original Q was named the Silhouette, and it was created specifically so you could commission knives with a unique company logo of your very own. The Q series is comprised almost exclusively of knives with laser cut logos, including a 1998 SHOT Show edition.

 

The Spyderco Co-Pilot

Fans of this Co-Pilot model say it has the smoothest action of the bunch. Since only 1,200 pieces were ever produced, getting your hands on one puts you in an exclusive Spyderco club of collectors.

 

This may be hard to believe considering the rules and regulations of the present day, but originally the Co-Pilot was sold as a two-inch airline knife that you could take with you on a plane. The original Co-Pilot was produced between 1987 and 2001, before the full ban on bladed items on airplanes, and while times have changed this compact design endures. Here we have one of the more expensive variations that was introduced as a sprint run in 2006 and comes with VG-10 steel and Almite aluminum handles.

 

The Spyderco Native III

 

Now for something a little more familiar to the non-collecting knife lovers out there – the Native III. This is an example of a knife that has seen quite an evolution since the original Native was released in 1997. The C78 Native III you’re seeing here has an industry nickname – ‘3D’ – because of the handle’s thick design, palm swell, and textured thumb and finger pads. Introduced in 2004, this version of the Native III has a VG-10 blade and a distinct swedge-grind that reduces weight and adds balance.

The Native line continues to be a pretty prolific series, but the latest iterations still keep the same overall aesthetic.

 

A back-to-back shot of the original Native III and a new Native 5 makes it easy to see the newer model’s upgraded S35VN full flat grind blade. The Native 5 also has a screw construction and is produced in Spyderco’s USA factory in Golden, Colorado. 

 

The Spyderco Vesuvius

 

Designed by late longtime custom knifemaker and former President of the American Knifemaker’s Guild Frank Centofante, this first generation Vesuvius was introduced in 2001 with ATS-34 steel – the predecessor to ATS-55. This knife kicked off a series of Spyderco-Centofante collaborations that includes four Vesuvius models, and his presence made such an impact that Spyderco designed a memorial knife in his name to commemorate the incredible contributions he made to educate Spyderco’s manufacturing team.

 

The Spyderco Endura

The original Endura was one of the first Spyderco knives that came with a tip-up pocket clip.

 

The Endura made waves in 1990 when it was first introduced and won Blade Magazine’s ‘Overall Knife of the Year’. The original iteration had some features that were later improved or changed for future Spyderco knives – the pocket clip, for example, was notorious for breaking because of its thin build. Later versions had a thicker clip to avoid cracking and breaking issues. Spyderco produced a version with a red Zytel handle, as well, before using that handle color exclusively for their training knives – a practice they maintain to this day.

 

The latest Endura models have come a long way. Newer Enduras have a larger Spydie Hole, a four-way pocket clip, skeletonized liners, and a thicker tip than their old school predecessors.

 

One of the coolest things about looking back at these classic models is that you can really see Spyderco getting their footing – these small changes and additions are reflected in every new Spyderco knife that we see. Of course, we can’t talk about the Endura without also bringing up…

 

The Spyderco Delica

The ‘Big Brother’ to the Endura, the Delica has seen a myriad of updates and improvements throughout its decades-long history.

 

This industry favorite has been in every single one of Spyderco’s product catalogs since at least 1993. Originally designed by Sal Glesser, the first generation Delica became a bestseller that was created specifically to provide a lightweight pocket knife with a one-handed opening that almost anyone could afford. The second generation Delica was debuted in 2006 with some new upgrades – a stainless steel handle, a stainless steel pocket clip, and an AUS-6 steel blade. It wasn’t until 2001 that the Boye dent and reversible pocket clip were added to the Generation 3 model.

 

Just like with the Endura, the Delica has come a long way from the original. These two knives have seen much of the same improvements over time, including the larger Spydie Hole and Boye dent lockback mechanism.

 

That wraps up some of our favorites – what classic Spyderco knives do you have in your collection? We’re always itching for any chance to whip out some of our oldies (and goodies). What knives would you like to see next? Be sure to visit our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter and tag us in some photos of your own vintage Spyderco knives.

KnifeCenter is the original and largest online catalog of cutlery, and that includes the best Spyderco knives in the world.

The Results of the Knife World Cup!

We received more than 20,000 comments over the course of 15 rounds in our Knife World Cup tournament – no small achievement, and we have all of you to thank! Any time we do a giveaway we hit some of our highest numbers, but this was definitely one of our more successful campaigns. From June 11th to July 18th, we asked you guys to stay tuned to our social media feeds and vote in every round – and one lucky winner (congrats, Daniel!) who did so won a Chris Reeve Sebenza.

The goal of this tournament was for the best knife to win, so we did see some unlikely matchups. We know we compared apples and oranges sometimes, but it was all done at random to ensure that we didn’t put any of our bias into the tournament. We also counted all the comments. Nothing was done by eye – we let an Excel spreadsheet do the work, instead. Here is a rundown of each round so you can see just how much your vote counted.

 

Round One – Match 01

The Benchmade Griptilian reigned supreme in this round, beating the Ontario Rat 1,257 to 422.

 

Round One – Match 02

Round two was a shutout victory for Zero Tolerance, whose 0562 beat the Emerson CQC-7 1,253 to 351.

 

Round One – Match 03

This matchup was much closer than the previous ones – the Buck 110 won over the WE Knives 703, 841 to 533.

 

Round One – Match 04

Another close round, but Rick Hinderer’s XM-18 still came out on top over Cold Steel’s Recon – the final score was 761 to 575.

 

Round One – Match 05

One of our closest rounds of the entire tournament, the Kershaw Leek went head-to-head with Boker’s Kwaiken. The Kwaiken came out on top, 709 to 622.

 

Round One – Match 06

KA-BAR’s 1217 USMC smoked the ESEE Izula – the final score was 1,285 to 681.

 

Round One – Match 07

This round introduced the overall winner, so we obviously know the outcome of this one – the Chris Reeve Sebenza beat out the Microtech Ultratech 814 to 425.

 

Round One – Match 08

The final match of round one was a total landslide – Spyderco’s Paramilitary 2 beat the Kizer Gemini 1,022 to 133.

 

Round Two – Match 01

The Griptilian once again came out on top, beating the Buck 110 1,025 to 372.

 

Round Two – Match 02

The Sebenza was victorious once again, this time knocking the Boker Kwaiken out of the tournament. The final score was 961 to 323.

 

Round Two – Match 03

ZT came out on top against Rick Hinderer’s XM-18. The 0562 won 711 to 461.

 

Round Two – Match 04

The final match of round two brought Spyderco victory – the Paramilitary 2 dominated over the 1217 USMC 923 to 308.

 

Semi-Finals – Match 01

Things are firing up, and the Griptilian couldn’t take the heat. The Sebenza won 651 to 496.

 

Semi-Finals – Match 02

The Paramilitary 2 heads to the final round after winning 720 to 459 against the ZT 0562.

 

The Final Round!

Here we have it – the final round. It was close, and the Paramilitary 2 put up one heck of a fight…but the victory went to the Chris Reeve Sebenza with a final score of 730 to 539.

 

This was a fun experiment on our end, and we hope you guys got just as much joy as we did reading through the comments and seeing different perspectives on the matchups. Despite our penchant for mischief (looking at you, That’s What I Call Knives: Volume One), nothing was rigged on our end. At the end of the day, we have to give you guys props for your taste in knives – you definitely picked a winner!

 

Boker Plus TUF Urban Fixed Blade

Boker Plus TUF Urban Fixed Blade
Boker Plus TUF Urban Fixed Blade
Boker Knives produces another great fixed blade knife. Once again Boker takes a great and innovative design by some great craftsmen and has it produced at the top quality Asian factories at amazing prices. In short- you get the best designs at the best prices. This knife makes a great camp knife because of its medium size and easy carry options. It will work well in a camp kitchen. It would make a nice bushcraft knife with the wide, flat ground hard steel blade. The shape of this knife is really unique with a great handle made of dark Cocobolo wood that cradles your hand. Blade shape is wide and flat ground. The blade is nicely polished 440C – which is a steel that a lot of users respect quite a bit. The sheath design is also new and innovative. You can see these at www.knifecenter.com

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Mora Frost of Sweden Bushcraft Survival Knife Fixed 4-1/4″ Plain Steel Blade, Black Handle

Mora Frost of Sweden Bushcraft Knives

The Bushcraft wilderness survival method from Australia is quickly becoming popular in the northern hemisphere, and Mora of Sweden has a full range of knives for your training! Mora knives have a long history dating back to the medieval times. Tested and proven, the Mora style remains in use throughout Scandinavia today and has become popular with bushcraft enthusiasts due to the simplicity and maintainability of the Mora design. You can see these knives at www.knifecenter.com (Bushcraft Survival featured in the above picture)

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Canal Street Cutlery Folding Hunter Chestnut Handles Leather Sheath

Canal Street Cutlery Folding Hunter Chestnut Handles Leather Sheath
Canal Street Cutlery Folding Hunter Chestnut Handles Leather Sheath
Canal Street Cutlery does a great job of hand building knives top quality in the USA. We’re thrilled to offer these beautiful items and our customers are always impressed with the quality and beauty of Canal Street Cutlery products.
This new folding hunter is a real beauty. I’m not sure anyone will want to use it because it is so beautiful! The handle is made from reclaimed American Chestnut (see more below). The knife blade is mirror polished as are the liners and bolsters. Everything just fits and fits perfectly. Each is serial numbered and they are all limited editions made entirely in the USA! You can see these at www.knifecenter.com
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Spyderco Bushcraft Fixed Blade Hunting Knife

Spyderco Bushcraft Fixed Blade Hunting Knife
Spyderco Bushcraft Fixed Blade Hunting Knife, Black G10 Handles
The Bushcraft is a revised version of their wood handle fixed blade from Spyderco inspired by survivalists in the UK.
Very well made, medium sized fixed blade with a shaped G10 handle. EThe blades are satin finish. The leather belt sheath is well made with thick, saddle leather and metal rivets. The knife sits down low in the sheath. The blade grind is a Continue Reading

Buck Knives Winter Omni Hunter

Buck Knives Omni Hunter Winter Camo
Buck Knives Winter Omni Hunter

Just in time for hunting season, check out this great hunting knife from Buck. The winter camo gives it a very distinct look, but it is all Buck underneath. The handle is rubber for lots of grip and no hand fatigue. The blade is 420HC, so it will take an edge in the field without a hassle. Made in the USA.

See this knife at www.knifecenter.com

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